Bound By A Plantation, Two Georgians Remember A Special Christmas

December 21, 2014 - photo frame

Martha McCullough shows off a print of her grandfather, Christmas Moultrie, who was innate on a Mulberry Grove Plantation before Gen. Sherman's army burnt it down forward of a constraint of Savannah in 1864. Both McCullough and Hugh Golson, a successor of a plantation's owner, knew Moultrie as children.i
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Martha McCullough shows off a print of her grandfather, Christmas Moultrie, who was innate on a Mulberry Grove Plantation before Gen. Sherman's army burnt it down forward of a constraint of Savannah in 1864. Both McCullough and Hugh Golson, a successor of a plantation's owner, knew Moultrie as children.

Martha McCullough shows off a print of her grandfather, Christmas Moultrie, who was innate on a Mulberry Grove Plantation before Gen. Sherman’s army burnt it down forward of a constraint of Savannah in 1864. Both McCullough and Hugh Golson, a successor of a plantation’s owner, knew Moultrie as children.



Carl Elmore/Courtesy Savannah Morning News

On Dec. 21, 1864, Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman prisoner a city of Savannah, finale his Mar to a Sea.

In a days heading adult to Savannah’s obey to a Union, Sherman’s infantry burnt a circuitously Mulberry Grove Plantation. They also liberated hundreds of slaves, including a baby child who would grow adult on a land as a giveaway man.

One hundred and fifty years later, a descendants of some of a people vital on that camp still share a special tie to that man.

Hugh Golson, a late story teacher, is a wiry white male in his mid-60s with splendid blue eyes.

Martha McCullough, 87, is a former class propagandize teacher. She’s African-American, dressed in a gratifying red sweater and shawl during Golson’s Victorian home in downtown Savannah. The residence is filled with antiques, bookshelves and richly-painted immature walls lonesome in aged photographs.

Hugh Golson stops subsequent to a stairs of what was once a categorical residence of Mulberry Grove Plantation. His ancestor, Zachariah Winkler, once owned a camp and watched as Gen. Sherman's army burnt a residence down.i
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Hugh Golson stops subsequent to a stairs of what was once a categorical residence of Mulberry Grove Plantation. His ancestor, Zachariah Winkler, once owned a camp and watched as Gen. Sherman's army burnt a residence down.

Hugh Golson stops subsequent to a stairs of what was once a categorical residence of Mulberry Grove Plantation. His ancestor, Zachariah Winkler, once owned a camp and watched as Gen. Sherman’s army burnt a residence down.



Steve Bisson/Courtesy Savannah Morning News

Golson binds adult a tiny print of a white male embellished out in a bullion watch.

“This is my forerunner that owned her grandfather,” Golson says. “This is Zachariah Winkler, a master of Mulberry, a second-largest rice planter on a Savannah River.”

It was taken, he says, in a studios of a famed photographer Matthew Brady. Another, incomparable image depicts an comparison African-American man, with a line of trees behind him, wearing a corduroy cap. That’s McCullough’s grandfather, Christmas Moultrie.

Golson says Moultrie was innate on Christmas Day, 1863, a year before Sherman’s organisation arrived. Some accounts, though, contend he was innate in a late 1850s.

“But this is a male that owned him and owned his parents. So we like to keep them together, and we like to have Christmas in a incomparable frame,” Golson says.

Growing adult in a 1930s and ’40s, McCullough visited her grandfather during a aged Mulberry plantation, where he’d been innate in slavery. He stayed on and worked there most of his life, vital mostly off a land.

‘That Fascinating Man’ — Caretaker, Moonshiner And Judge

“Oftentimes he would go sport and fishing, and he was a caretaker,” McCullough remembers.

McCullough and Golson contend Moultrie also done a small income on a side, distilling and offered bootleg moonlight on a property. Even after so many years, McCullough is still a small diffident about deliberating it.

“You know, we competence could contend it now,” she says. “I was a small lady holding moonlight wine to a judges in a courthouse. we was this small black lady — “

“— Bringing her granddaddy’s wares,” Golson says.

“Moonshine, in a courthouse,” McCullough laughs. “How illegal!”

Moultrie mostly attempted to keep his stretch from a authorised system, however. Growing adult among a initial era of former slaves, Moultrie told his neighbors to work out disputes on their own, though involving white judges, McCullough says.

“Everyone had their problems,” she says. “Any form of family problems, my grandfather was a judge. Christmas Moultrie (would) solve a problem.”

As a immature child, Golson also knew Moultrie, until Moultrie’s death.

“He was an iconic figure to me,” Golson says. “He was that fascinating male that lived right there during a gate, holding caring of everything.”

Moultrie was too immature to remember it, though Sherman’s attainment during Mulberry Grove in Dec 1864 is described in Savannah River Plantations, a book published in 1947 as partial of a sovereign Works Progress Administration practice project.

Golson keeps a duplicate on his bookshelf. He says a account, that describes Sherman’s infantry blazing down a camp in front of Winkler as a worker stood guard, is identical to stories handed down in his family about a war.

“But Martha can tell us what was unequivocally function during Mulberry,” Golson says. “Her grandfather told her that those fight years were hard, that they were hungry, that they didn’t have most food. You improved trust they hold a gun on a male that done that happen.”

‘Trouble Don’t Last Always’

McCullough says her grandfather also told her about relocating on after tough times.

“I’m really beholden to God, that we let problems hurl divided like H2O off a steep back,” McCullough says. “I say, ‘Trouble don’t final always.’ That’s my thesis with my grandfather.”

Though McCullough and Golson both grew adult meaningful Moultrie, and knew any other by their work as teachers, they didn’t always know of their tie by him.

“We were sitting during a list together for substantially a dozen years before we satisfied we had this aged tie between us,” Golson says.

In a early 1990s, they ran into any other during a assembly of a organisation perplexing to safety Mulberry Grove as a ancestral site. That’s when they connected a dots.

“It was illusory to know that Hugh knew my grandfather,” McCullough says. “I said, ‘You knew my grandfather?’ “

“That is a male that kind of firm us together,” Golson says.

That bond, that began on a camp nearby a finish of a Civil War, is one they contend they’ll share for a rest of their lives, and beyond. Before McCullough leaves Golson’s home, she has one request: “I’m going to ask Hugh to greatfully … have something to contend during my funeral.”

“Any time,” Golson replies, “but Martha, you’re supposed that I’m going to endure you. It competence be a other way, [the way] you’re going. You competence have to pronounce during my funeral.”

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