Bits and pieces of a zeitgeist in a new SooVAC show

December 4, 2014 - photo frame



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    In “years,” Diane Behl collages together printed, drawn, photocopied and found images into a free-floating abstraction.

    Photo: Images supposing by Soo Visual Arts Center,

    CameraStar Tribune print galleries

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    Besides talent spotting, open-call juried shows are a good sampling of a zeitgeist. Rummaging by boatloads of art, jurors might view a stylistic trend or theme. Suddenly angst is in a air, or shamrock immature is trending, or wild politics gnaws a common unconscious. Skulls have been so renouned of late that some jurors have criminialized them. Ditto animé characters, graffiti and lavatory plumbing.

    Winnowing a 190 field for “Untitled 11,” a 11th annual juried uncover during Soo Visual Arts Center, jurors Caroline Kent and Tom Rassieur chose thoughtful, low-key, well-designed art that dodged a clichés du jour. No urinals! What’s not to like?

    Kent, a St. Paul-based artist and co-founder of a choice muster space a Bindery Project, and Rassieur, curator of prints and drawings during a Minneapolis Institute of Arts, picked usually 18 artists, any of whom is represented by one or some-more objects — photos, sculpture, paintings, striking designs, an charcterised film. The uncover runs by Dec. 28.

    The show’s many surprising piece, Adam White’s “The Second Will,” consists of hundreds of small review froth mounted in overlapping, 3-D lines within a design frame. Clipped from a comic frame or striking novel, a froth review as a stream-of-consciousness murder poser in some far-out dimension. Though done usually of words, a construction deftly evokes ceaselessly changing mental cinema as it is scanned.

    There’s a desirable naiveté to Kelly Meister’s digital-collage video “Where Do We Go From Here?” in that drawings of animals (dogs, beaver, bunnies, birds) competition by a watercolor forest intercut with rapids footage and drawings of increasingly soiled cities. The severe prolongation values are a good fit with critters in unfortunate hunt of a haven.

    As a normal painter, Aaron Kagan Putt also has effectively matched his middle to his message. In dual portraits he depicts guys whose smarts have radically been transposed by tangled fields of energy lines and electronic gizmos. Only their mouths and torsos remember their obese nature. In his “Marginalized Self” portrait, Douglas Brull also uses different media to advise disunion by covering photos of his face with a paper mask, a block of blue paper propped adult with a 2-by-2 board, and so on.

    Didactic urgency

    Race, violence, misery and exploitation are addressed with terse coercion elsewhere.

    Kyle Johnson articulates a nation’s ambivalence about President Obama’s competition in a frivolous tone print of a boss on that he has created a difference “not white enough.” It’s interconnected with an matching photo, lonesome with a skinny deceive of varnish noted “not black enough.” Chris Scott’s sculpture “Candy for My Baby” effectively takes a imitate during a omnipresence of guns and ammo in American life by dispensing porcelain bullets from a vending machine. Christopher Harrison deals with labor abuse and starvation in dual small, tombstone-shaped paintings: “Gold Standard,” in that a worker’s skinny ribs are manifest by a shade of gold, and “Bloody Sunday,” in that lava-thick red paint rolls down toward a throng of starving children. And Byron Anway constructed dual tiny oils, “Fight,” in that a boisterous throng reaches toward a man in midair, and “Silence,” in that guys in suits are confining and muzzling one of their own.

    There are also quirky designs. Ana Taylor’s 4 “Wisconsin Mythologies” are amusing, orange-legged characters collaged from photos and drawings of antlers, feathers, tablecloths and so on. Diana Behl creates easily offset abstractions from scribbles, stripes, grids and geometric shapes. The blue abstractions in Margaret Pezalla-Granlund’s “Dream Objects” cyanotypes were somehow desirous by memory and a residency during a Museum of Jurassic Technology. And Keren Kroul has voiced an “Unquiet Mind” as an eight-panel aerial map of strange bright shapes in blue and green.

    Tackling issues

    Beyond that, most of a art nods during discouraging issues though leaves them mired in shade or addresses them so obliquely as to offer small insight.

    Photographer Laura Crosby, for example, offers a easily stoical black-and-white print patrician “Sex Trafficking Via a Rear View Mirror.” It shows a half-dozen accidentally dressed organisation and women, all African-American, during a corner of a grassy lot or park during midday. One lady is vocalization to someone in a flitting van; another is seen coming in a rear-view mirror. A identical organisation clusters on a conflicting side of a park. Maybe they are sex traffickers, though there’s meagre visible support for that narrative.

    Environmental topics might slink in peculiar corners such as Sho Nikaido’s “Bouquet for a Sunset U’ve Never Seen,” that pairs 14 disciplined tone photos (beach foam, pool scum, red-leather automobile interior, man during chain-link fence, etc.) with a agreeably harmless soundtrack. Or in Kelsey Bosch’s minimalist print and appealing store of expel iron, colourless and flattering pieces of aqua plastic-looking stuff. Or in Stephen Stephens’ good tone photos of grasses, pavement piles and highway salt. Or in a cool-looking backlit discs of amber “microbial culture” that Jamie Winter Dawson has unhelpfully patrician “Inception Retained.”

    Probably such art has something to do with inlet and tellurian meddling. But aside from a oddity, exoticism and prettiness of a images, their indicate is opaque.

    Mary Abbe • 612-673-4431



    • related content

    • Kelsey Bosch’s 2013 installation“Iron Selkie” includes a sketch and artfully organised lumps of charcoal.

    • In a black-and-white photo, Laura Crosby interpreted a travel entertainment as “Sex Trafficking Via a Rear View Mirror.”

    • Untitled 11

      When: 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Thu.-Fri., 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat.-Sun. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Wed. Ends Dec. 28.

      Where: 2638 Lyndale Av. S., Mpls.

      Admission: Free.

      Also: SooVAC’s annual Artists Holiday Shop opens during noon Sat. during 3506 Nicollet Av. S., Mpls.

      Info: www.soovac.org or 612-871-2263.

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